Jones, Holder win! We Loyal Sons and Daughters All to replace Nelson Loop Barbados

The content originally appeared on: News Americas Now

Black Immigrant Daily News

The content originally appeared on: Barbados News

Vincent Jones and Hugh Holder have 15,000 reasons to smile brighter now that their Monument Design has won and will come to fruition in National Heroes Square.

Despite a delayed announcement, as the winner was to be made known on November 25, the pair was most pleased with the outcome of the Monument Design Competition which saw them going up against 10 other designs initially, and then pitted against two in the final three.

The monument will rid the country’s capital city of the final physical remnants of the British Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson statue that once stood in National Heroes Square, formerly Trafalgar Square. The plinth is still in the spot through the bronzed statue was removed in 2021.

It is not just about the statue itself, it’s about the message that this sends to our society

Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office with responsibility for Culture, Senator Dr Shantal Munro-Knight announced the winners in the courtyard of Parliament.

Jones and Holder’s design We Loyal Sons and Daughters All earned them a cash prize of $15,000.

Minister in the Prime Minister ‘s Office with responsibility for Culture, Senator Dr. Shantal Munro-Knight, presents Hugh Holder (centre) and Vincent Jones with their prize for winning the Monument Design Competition, today. Their design is entitled We Loyal Sons and Daughters All. (B. Hinds/BGIS)

Kevin Talma’s The Monument to the Barbadian Family earned him the second prize of $7,000. Reunion by Sheena Weekes, Israel Mapp and Jamal Weekes, received $3,000 for their design.

The minister said the decision to erect a monument in National Heroes Square in honour of the Barbadian family was part of government’s wider plans for urban renewal.

She underscored the importance of renewing city spaces and pointed out:

“If we think about all of the things that are happening within the context of this City space, that will in the future transform it in fundamental ways, [and] we look across to the Fairchild Street Market upgrade, where the government is ensuring that what we would call the hucksters and the vendors now have proper accommodation, that is safe, and is well lighted and is secure…It is the ordinary people and the social transformation that this process is about,” Senator Dr. Munro-Knight underlined.

She further stated: “When we look at the renaming of the bus stand, again, who does that reflect? Us! The Jackie [Opel] Amphitheatre, who does that reflect? Us! So that when we talk about monuments and when we talk about urban renewal in this context, it is about imbuing national consciousness for us. It is not just about the statue itself, it’s about the message that this sends to our society. That is the journey….”

Minister Munro-Knight also encouraged Barbadians to continue the journey for generations to come, so that they would have a better understanding of the legacy left by previous generations and prevent past mistakes.

What better national hero than a family?

She added that a monument depicting the struggles and successes of the Barbadian family, whom she described as the “greatest national hero, should be erected in the heart of the family since there were other monuments and places of significance in recognition of the island’s national heroes.

Senator Dr Munro-Knight told her audience: “That the family, the men and the women and the children who are here, are critical in forging the Barbados that my grandchildren, your grandchildren, great-grandchildren will come to know…..it is the family and the stories of the Bussas and the Nanny Grigg’s and their struggle that defined this country.

“And why should they not be celebrated right in the heart of Bridgetown and our City? All throughout this country, we have other monuments and places of significance for our national heroes. What better national hero than a family?”

The Minister further stated: “What better national hero than the men and women…the average men and women who by their hands and their toil and their struggle, continue day-to-day life [with] their love and pride for this country are the ones who have helped us and I’m exceedingly proud of all of us as a country that we have come to this particular moment.”

Dr Munro-Knight reflected on the process from the launch of the Competition on May 15, during the Season of Emancipation, on the day recognised as the United Nations International Day of the Family, and reiterated that the decision to erect a monument to the family in National Heroes Square was one that was transparent and involved the input from society.

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